SURFACES - UConn - '18 - Wall Art

“Surfaces” - an exhibit of spontaneous visions Water (fluid and evolving) and macchia (instantaneous vision) are primary inspirations for this exhibit. Water is familiar - ‘macchia’ will be described more below. My photography is predominantly realist, organic, non-composed imagery. I concentrate on waterscapes and their flora and fauna with occasional still life and abstract works . My most satisfying images evoke palpable emotion. Images obtained on and with natural waters are a true passion. Early mornings on the water are prime – highly fluid and ephemeral. I seek those reflections with unique symmetries, images with the quiet emotions or misty scenes with the dawn’s low angle lighting. Regardless of the added challenges, my kayak becomes as much the artist’s tool as my camera. Images from my “Farmington River Collection” have been shown in many venues, solo and juried exhibitions and presentations. As much as I enjoy natural water-born imagery, I have been distracted by that occasional unexpected vision of something excitingly different. For instance a totally novel view of a relatively simple scene or something incongruous, dissonant, abstract, humorous or even frightening. “Surfaces” contrasts the realist with the more distracted images found in those environments. The common feature is the spontaneous nature of the inspiration. The medium of photography is unrivaled in its ability to capture the spontaneous. In today’s media dominant environment, the eye assimilates multi-millions of images that the brain filters into its own small curated library of artistic “likes”. In the late 19th century, the Italian artist Vittorio Imbriani defined the concept of ‘macchia’ - the instantaneous recognition of a total compositional effect. Macchia was also described as the pictorial idea, the sine qua non of an art work, the indispensible essential1,2. Macchia describes that instant semi-conscious eye-brain filter process. When both my muse and macchia register a sudden interest in a scene, I must find out why. Macchia can also be a conscious source for inspiration. By increasing my sensory awareness, consciousness shifts to my right brain where both macchia and muse reside. The images in “Surfaces” are a product of my joy in being on the water at dawn and the inspired vision of a macchia-focused consciousness. ....................................................... (1) Known and Strange Things by Teju Cole, Random House, 2016, p 186............................................... (2) Nineteenth-Century Theories of Art by Joshua C. Taylor Univ. of California Press, 1989, p 493

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